Partially Examined Life tracks on Soundclound

#partially-examined-life

  • Pretty Much Pop #60: Manga 101 w/ Deborah Shamoon
    Partially Examined Life
    49:29
    27

    Mark, Erica and Brian (all manga noobs) are joined by Japanese Studies prof. to talk about barriers for Americans to appreciate manga, different manga types (Deborah works on shojo manga, i.e. for girls), Osamu Tezuka (the "god of comics" who created Astro Boy et al), classic vs. new manga, gender portrayals, and more. For more, visit . Hear bonus content for this episode at .

  • PEL Special: Nightcap Late September 2020
    Partially Examined Life
    23:16
    14

    We're releasing JUST THIS ONE Nightcap to the wider public so induce you all to go and so gain the ability to hear these free-wheeling, feeling-sharing, email-reading fiestas between every regular episode. This time we gripe about Habermas and reflect on what secondary sources we use. We consider whether to have an episode on anarchism and if we should ever have guests on who are hard-core adherents of the philosophy we're discussing. We reveal which reading we've covered has pleasantly surprised each of us the most. Finally, we talk about how to front-load our episodes so that folks who do not sign up to hear the part 2's still get a satisfying, self-contained experience.

  • PREVIEW-Ep. 252: Habermas on Communication as Sociality (Part Two)
    Partially Examined Life
    05:13
    14

    If you'd like to hear more of the discussion on Jürgen Habermas' "Actions, Speech Acts, Linguistically Mediated Interactions, and the Lifeworld" (1998) that we started in , you'll need to go sign up at . We're just sharing a few minutes of part two here to get you all hot and bothered. You're welcome!

  • PEL Presents (sub)Text: Things Fall Apart in W.B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”: Part 1
    Partially Examined Life
    36:06
    14

    In 1919, the world seemed to have descended into anarchy. World War I had killed millions and profoundly altered the international order. Four empires, along with their aristocracies, had disintegrated. Russia was in a state of civil war, and Ireland was on the verge of its own. It’s these events that helped inspire William Butler Yeats’ poem “The Second Coming,” which famously tells us that “things fall apart,” that “the center cannot hold,” and that a new historical epoch is upon us. Just what rough beast is it that slouches, as Yeats has it, toward Bethlehem? Wes & Erin discuss.  Subscribe: won’t always be in the PEL feed, so please subscribe to us directly: | | | Bonus content: The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Follow (sub)Text: | |

  • PEL Presents: Filial Ingratitude in in Shakespeare’s "King Lear"
    Partially Examined Life
    01:25:59
    62

    Do we owe parents our gratitude for our upbringing? What if they haven’t done such a great job? And anyway, perhaps we inevitably resent all the forces that have shaped the characters that confine and limit us. If so, the quest for filial gratitude is ultimately hopeless. It could even be a kind of madness: a foolish attempt to transcend the same formative forces that we resent in our parents, to be “unaccommodated,” free of the “plague of custom.” Wes and Erin discuss William Shakespeare’s King Lear. Subscribe: won’t always be in the PEL feed, so please subscribe to us directly: | | | Bonus content: The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Follow (sub)Text: | |

  • NEM#131: Ward White Audited
    Partially Examined Life
    01:02:32
    30

    Ward has issued about ten releases of lyric-driven, stylish pop since 2003. We discuss the title track from (2020), "Titans" from (2018), and the title track from (2008). Intro: "Sabbath" from (2014). End: "Bubble and Squeak," also from the new album. For info see . . . .

  • Ep. 252: Habermas on Communication as Sociality (Part One)
    Partially Examined Life
    55:07
    41

    On Jürgen Habermas' "Actions, Speech Acts, Linguistically Mediated Interactions, and the Lifeworld" (1998), with guest . What's the relation between individuals and society? Habermas says that language has ethics built right into it: I'm trying to get you to agree with me, to engage in a cooperative enterprise of mutual understanding. Part two of this episode is only going to be available to you if you sign up at . or . Sponsors: Visit for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service. Open a real estate portfolio at and get your first 90 days of advisory fees waived.

  • PEL Presents: The “Intelligent Way to Approach Marriage” in Hitchcock’s "Rear Window"
    Partially Examined Life
    01:11:37
    91

    L.B. Jefferies has the perfect girlfriend—beautiful, intelligent, wealthy—but too perfect, he insists, for marriage. And so he spends his time spying on the love lives of his neighbors, and ropes his girlfriend into this project as well. Which, strangely enough, turns out to be a really effective form of couples’ therapy. What’s the connection between voyeurism and what Jefferies calls “the intelligent way to approach marriage”? Wes and Erin discuss Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 film Rear Window. Thanks to for permission re-purpose his for the cover art. Subscribe: won’t always be in the PEL feed, so please subscribe to us directly: | | | Bonus content: The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Follow (sub)Text: | |

  • Pretty Much Pop #59: David Lynch's Popular Surrealism
    Partially Examined Life
    45:34
    98

    Mark, Erica, Brian, and guest Mike Wilson discuss the director's films from Eraserhead to Inland Empire plus Twin Peaks and his recent short films. We get into the appeal and hallmarks of his mainstays--Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway, and Mulholland Drive--and also consider outliers like Dune, The Elephant Man, and The Straight Story. How many of these films actually make sense, and failing to do so bad? For more, visit . Hear bonus content for this episode at . Sponsor: Get 15% off earbuds at w/ offer code "Pretty15."

  • Pretty Much Pop Aftertalk Clip Show 2020
    Partially Examined Life
    23:01
    79

    With no new Pretty Much Pop episode this week, we've collected some highlights from the supporter-only aftertalks that we record with every episode to reveal to the general public. Feast upon these non-sequitur nuggets of wisdom and mirth! Get all the aftertalks at .

  • NEM#130: Mark Farner (ex Grand Funk Railroad) Back from the Dead
    Partially Examined Life
    58:29
    44

    Mark led Grand Funk Railroad through 13 albums in the 70s and early 80s and has had around eight solo releases. We discuss "Nadean" from (2006), "Not Yet" from (1991), and the title track of by Grand Funk Railroad. End song: "." Intro: "I'm Your Captain" from GFR's (1979). For more see . . . .

  • Ep. 251: Simone Weil's Ideal Society
    Partially Examined Life
    01:15:10
    49

    On "Theoretical Picture of a Free Society" (1934). What's the ideal living situation for us all, given the peculiarities of human nature? Weil describes fulfillment as coming from being able to picture goals and plans and knowingly put them into effect, so social groups need to maximize that power by being small and cooperative. End song: "Libreville" by Bill Bruford, as interviewed for . Get this episode ad-free with a , which also gets you access to our and future Part Two episodes. Sponsors: Get $35 off meal delivery at , code PEL. Open a real estate portfolio at and get your first 90 days of advisory fees waived.

  • Ep. 250: Simone Weil on Human Needs (Part Three)
    Partially Examined Life
    57:29
    33

    Concluding on "The Needs of the Soul" from The Need for Roots (1943). This time we cover punishment, security, risk, private property, collective property, freedom of opinion, and truth. Start with or get the full, ad-free . Supporting PEL will also get you access to our End song: "Even Though the Darkest Clouds" by liar, flower. Mark interviewed KatieJane Garside on . Sponsors: Visit for a free trial of The Great Courses Plus Video Learning Service. Get up to a $100 donation matched at , selecting "podcast" and "Partially Examined Life" at checkout. Subscribe to the Seth helped with!

  • PEL Presents (sub)Text: Truth as Beauty in Keats’ Ode on a "Grecian Urn"
    Partially Examined Life
    01:08:27
    135

    The poet is famous for the concept of “negative capability,” his description of the ability to tolerate the world’s uncertainty without resorting to easy answers. Literary minds in particular should be more attuned to beauty than facts and reason. In fact, truth in the highest sense is the same thing as beauty, he tells us at the end of his poem . What does that mean? Is it true? Wes and Erin discuss these questions, and how it is that aesthetic judgments can communicate a kind of truth that is not strictly descriptive or factual. Subscribe: won’t always be in the PEL feed, so please subscribe to us directly: | | | Bonus content: The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Follow (sub)Text: | | The cover art is based on Keats’ tracing of the , which may have helped inspire the poem. Thanks to Tyler Hislop for the audio editing on this episode.

  • Pretty Much Pop #58: "TAYLOR SWIFT RULES!" (Conversation with a Swiftie)
    Partially Examined Life
    48:05
    106

    Prompted by the release of new album and the 2020 documentary , Mark, Erica, and Brian speak with Amber Padgett about her love of Taylor, ranking the albums, why the hate, weird levels of fan engagement, double standards for female artists, and more. Designed to interest fans, haters, and folks curious as to what all the fuss is about. For more, visit . Hear bonus content for this episode at .

  • NEM#129: New People - Matt Ackerman and Mark Lint on Collaboration
    Partially Examined Life
    01:22:11
    362

    Your host dissects the collaborative chemistry with guitarist Matt Ackerman as the two front men of the band New People (2006-2013). We discuss "Down So Low" (intro: "Love Is the Problem") from (2008), "Manager" from (2011), and "Local" and "At the Time" from (2013), plus "We Who Have Escaped" (later in 2013, released on Songs from the Partially Examined Life). Intro: "Love Is the Problem" also from The Easy Thing. For more, see and . . . .

  • Ep. 250: Simone Weil on Human Needs (Part Two)
    Partially Examined Life
    54:14
    40

    Continuing on "The Needs of the Soul" from The Need for Roots (1943). We got started in with our need for order, and in this part we add liberty, obedience, responsibility, equality, hierarchy, and honor. We'll conclude with part 3, covering freedom of speech, punishment and more, but you needn't wait: Get the full, ad-free now. and you'll also get . Sponsor: Open a real estate portfolio at and get your first 90 days of advisory fees waived.

  • Pretty Much Pop #57: Back to the Damn Arena - The Hunger Games Prequel
    Partially Examined Life
    43:48
    114

    Remember when The Hunger Games was everywhere? Suzanne Collins returns to Just War Theory lessons with the prequel The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes. Mark, Erica, and Brian review the new book and look back on the YA novel/film franchise. Does the work critique yet glorify violence at the same time? Will the film version of the new novel be our next Phantom Menace? For more, visit . Hear bonus content for this episode at .

  • PEL Presents (sub)Text: Mastery and Repetition in "Groundhog Day"
    Partially Examined Life
    01:00:34
    95

    When egotistical weatherman Phil Connors gets trapped in a time loop in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, he gets drunk, steals money, manipulates women, binges on breakfast food, plays God… and finally grows up. The story charts Phil’s development over the course of thousands of repeated February 2nds. Along the way, it raises questions about our own capacity for growth. How do we go about improving ourselves? How can we escape boredom? Achieve fulfillment? Wes and Erin discuss the 1993 film Groundhog Day. Subscribe: won’t always be in the PEL feed, so please subscribe to us directly: | | | Bonus content: The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Follow (sub)Text: | | Thanks to for allowing us to repurpose his poster for the . Thanks to Tyler Hislop for the audio editing on this episode.

  • PEL Presents (sub)Text: Love and Wit in Shakespeare’s "Much Ado About Nothing"
    Partially Examined Life
    01:29:31
    65

    At the center of every courting ritual, there’s a great unknown. How do we know when we’ve met someone we can love? How do we know the other person is actually who they seem to be? In the beginning, all we have to go on is surface appearances, which amount to a kind of hearsay. The question is how to get beyond them. Wes and Erin discuss Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, which seems to suggest that witty banter is more than just good fun, and has an important role to play in getting to know others. The conversation continues on our after-show . Get this and other bonus content at by subscribing at . Subscribe: | | | Follow: | | Thanks to Tyler Hislop for the audio editing on this episode.