CBS This Morning Podcast tracks on Soundclound

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  • Wynton Marsalis on his latest work and the coronavirus pandemic
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    18:36
    News & Politics
    62

    Jazz musician Wynton Marsalis joins "CBS This Morning Saturday" co-host Michelle Miller to discuss his latest composition, "The Ever Fonky Lowdown." The managing and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center also discusses the impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on musicians and cultural institutions. He shares the personal toll COVID-19 has taken on his family - the passing of his father jazz Legend Ellis Marsalis, Jr.

  • CBS' Ted Koppel and Lesley Stahl Reflect on Political Conventions
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    27:02
    News & Politics
    38

    The coronavirus pandemic is changing how U.S. voters will pick a president. As the Democratic National Convention gets underway without any delegates or most speakers attending in person, CBS Sunday Morning Ted Koppel and 60 Minutes' Lesley Stahl look back at their past coverage of political conventions and discuss with CBS News political correspondent Ed O'Keefe what the future of the party conventions may look like.

  • School Matters: Establishing Routines Amid the Uncertainty
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    20:54
    News & Politics
    22

    Psychologist and CBS News contributor Lisa Damour says we are headed for a huge adolescent mental health crisis this fall if and when school is disrupted due to the coronavirus pandemic. She joins "CBS This Morning" national correspondent Jericka Duncan to explain why this is and to share tips on how parents might plan to address and get out ahead of it. Damour explains the importance of establishing routines amid the uncertainty and the things parents need to consider when deciding whether to send their children to school if they live in a district with in-person learning.

  • Ford Foundation President on Philanthropy, Social Justice and Capitalism
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    25:07
    News & Politics
    21

    Ford Foundation President Darren Walker talks with "CBS This Morning" co-host Anthony Mason about how the social justice philanthropy borrowed a billion dollars to help non-profit organizations and Americans hit by the pandemic. Walker explains why he says "we are asphyxiating" the idea of creating a better life for children and why he says wealthy, privileged Americans need to start thinking about how much they are willing to give up.

  • The Coronavirus Impact on the Developing World
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    25:32
    News & Politics
    13

    International Rescue Committee president and CEO David Miliband joins CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett to discuss how the developing world is handling the coronavirus pandemic gripping the globe. Miliband says we need to tackle the virus as a connected world since so much of our lives are globally interconnected. According to Miliband, access to testing remains an issue in many nations and COVID-19 is adding to a heightened sense of fragility among already fragile states.

  • 'The Atlantic' Science Writer on How the U.S. Failed in its Response to COVID-19
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    23:46
    News & Politics
    25

    An article from the September issue of "The Atlantic" aims to understand how the United States managed to find itself with a disproportionate amount of the world's coronavirus cases and deaths. A staff science writer for "The Atlantic," Ed Yong, joins CBS News' Anna Werner to discuss "How the Virus Won: Anatomy of An American Failure." He explains how the systemic problems with America's healthcare system contributed to the crisis and why a lack of information and guidance from the Trump administration exacerbated the problem.

  • Chefs Tom Colicchio and Nina Compton Call for Relief to Save the Restaurant Industry
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    32:46
    News & Politics
    60

    Restaurants have been some of the hardest hit businesses amid the coronavirus pandemic. Chef and television host Tom Colicchio discusses why he supports the Restaurants Act, a bipartisan proposal to provide $120 billion in aid to help small and midsize eateries. New Orleans chef Nina Compton explains the ripple effects that closing restaurants has on the economy. Speaking with CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett, Colicchio and Compton paint a dire future for the restaurant industry if assistance is not provided.

  • This COVID-19 Survivor is Begging You to Wear a Mask
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    13:53
    News & Politics
    32

    54-year-old Gregg Garfield was one of the first COVID-19 patients in California. He contracted the virus on a ski trip in Italy and ended up in a Burbank, California hospital for more than 60 days — 31 of those spent on a ventilator. Garfield's doctors gave him a 1% chance of survival. Now he's almost fully recovered and is pleading for people to heed the advice of health experts to wear a mask and maintain proper social distancing.

  • Silvia Moreno-Garcia's 'Mexican Gothic' Taps Into Gothic Horror Genre
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    23:17
    News & Politics
    18

    Silvia Moreno-Garcia's new novel has been called “a terrifying twist on classic gothic horror” and “darkly brilliant and captivating.” Set in the 1950s, "Mexican Gothic" tells the story of Noemí Taboada’s efforts to save her cousin from her husband and his family in their isolated mansion in the Mexican countryside. Moreno-Garcia tells CBS News correspondent Mireya Villarreal why she decided to wade into the gothic horror genre. Plus, she explains why it is important for authors to be transparent about how they are able to earn a living by writing.

  • 'A Dream Come True': Rep. John Lewis' Fight for the Museum of African American History and Culture
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    13:24
    News & Politics
    8

    One of Congressman John Lewis' lasting legislative victories was the establishment of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. CBS News' Chip Reid talks with the museum's interim director Dr. Spencer Crew as well as its founding director Lonnie Bunch, now head of the Smithsonian Institution, about Lewis' decades-long fight to make the museum a reality. They explain Lewis' instrumental role in the museum's creation and why he felt that learning our history was so important to ensure America lives up to its ideals.

  • Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs on How Universal Basic Income Can Close the Wealth Gap
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    22:36
    News & Politics
    6

    Michael Tubbs thought he was destined for either prison or death. He was born to a teenage mother and a father who was incarcerated. But he defied the odds and became the youngest and first Black mayor of Stockton, California when he was elected at the age of 26 in 2016 — the same day Donald Trump won the White House. Tubbs joins "CBS This Morning" lead national correspondent David Begnaud to explain how he has instated the nation’s first pilot program for universal basic income and is leading an initiative to expand the idea in other cities. Plus, Tubbs shares how his city's police department is participating in a race and reconciliation process. He also shares how he became the subject of the new HBO documentary “Stockton on my Mind,” which shows his personal and political journey.

  • Diversity in Sports: Being a Man of Color in Hockey
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    21:14
    News & Politics
    3

    Professional ice hockey player Akim Aliu discusses his experience as a Black man in the NHL and why he's on a mission to increase diversity in the sport. Speaking with CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett, Aliu shares the racism he experienced as a young boy playing the game. Hear why he was initially hesitant to speak out about the indignities he has experienced and about his recent friendship with Colin Kaepernick.

  • Actor Dennis Quaid on podcasting, 'Parent Trap' and his music
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    17:02
    News & Politics
    7

    Actor, musician and podcaster Dennis Quaid discusses the second season of his podcast, The Dennissance, reuniting with the cast of "The Parent Trap" and upcoming solo record with CBS News contributor Jamie Wax.

  • The Return of Professional Sports During the Coronavirus Pandemic
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    33:25
    News & Politics
    4

    With Major League Baseball beginning their season this week and the NBA attempting to resume their season, in the midst of a global coronavirus pandemic, how are professional sports leagues ensuring the safety and security of their players and staff? Dan Wolken, a national columnist for USA Today Sports, joins CBS News correspondent Mola Lenghi to discuss how competitive professional sport leagues are planning to return after more than four month hiatus. Wolken discusses whether we will we see professional tennis, football and college sports played this year.

  • Eva Longoria, Wilmer Valderrama and José Andrés on the inequalities COVID-19 is revealing
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    28:25
    News & Politics
    26

    Actors Eva Longoria and Wilmer Valderrama and chef José Andrés discuss how the Latinx community has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and how the crisis is revealing systemic inequalities in economic, health and political systems for Latinos. CBS News' Adriana Diaz spoke to the three friends and activists for “Pandemia: Latinos in Crisis,” a CBS News special.

  • Vacationing in the Era of COVID-19
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    21:37
    News & Politics
    3

    With many spring and summer travel plans derailed by the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. editor of Conde Nast Traveler Jesse Ashlock shares how you can still plan a vacation during these times. Speaking with CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett, Ashlock explains why road trips and “travel bubbles” are becoming the new normal. Plus, he shares the questions to ask hospitality providers about safety and cleanliness.

  • Supreme Court Wrap Up: How it Truly Became the Roberts Court
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    23:34
    News & Politics
    1

    The Supreme Court recently wrapped up its term, with decisions handed down on LGBTQ workplace discrimination, abortion clinic doctors, DREAMers, and the president’s financial records. Supreme Court scholar Ilya Shapiro, director of the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute, joins CBS News chief legal correspondent Jan Crawford to discuss the significance of these decisions and how this year it became "the Roberts Court" after Chief Justice John Roberts joined the majority for all but two cases.

  • Behind the appeal of famed astrologer Walter Mercado
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    36:29
    News & Politics
    3

    The new Netflix documentary "Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado" provides a rare glimpse into the life and world of astrologer Walter Mercado, who was a television staple for decades. "CBS This Morning" national correspondent David Begnaud spoke with co-directors and co-producers Cristina Costantini and Kareem Tabsch and fellow producer Alex Fumero about how they gained access to Mercado, what they were surprised to discover, and the personal connection they have to Mercado.

  • What to Watch, Read and Listen to From Black Artists This Summer
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    26:02
    News & Politics
    1

    Vanessa De Luca, editor-in-chief of the online magazine ZORA, joins "CBS This Morning" correspondent Vladimir Duthiers to discuss books, music and movies to check out this summer. De Luca offers suggestions for how to remain informed amid national conversations about racial justice. She also explains how ZORA, a platform for, by, and about women of color, sheds lights on Black artists that have often been overlooked.

  • Comedy Writers Alan Zweibel and Norman Lear on how Laughter Can Help Heal Hardships
    CBS This Morning Podcast
    38:20
    News & Politics
    9

    Alan Zweibel, one of the original writers on Saturday Night Live, and legendary television producer Norman Lear join CBS News' Dr. Jon LaPook to discuss what they learned from setbacks in their own careers. Zweibel is out with a new memoir called "Laugh Lines: My Life Helping Funny People Be Funnier." He and Lear discuss the roll of comedy when dealing with difficult situations — and how this outlook can help people cope amid the coronavirus pandemic. Kate Lear, Norman's daughter (who also happens to be Dr. LaPook's wife), shares the philosophies her father adopted after his less successful moments in show business.