FaberBooks tracks on Soundclound

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  • Randomly Moving Particles
    FaberBooks
    01:35
    167

    Randomly Moving Particles is built from two long poems that form its opening and close, connected by three shorter pieces. The title poem, in a kaleidoscope of compelling scenes, engages with subjects that include migration, placement, loss, space exploration and current British and American politics. It is a clarifying action and reaction between terra and solar system, mundanity and possibility, taking us from the grit of road surfaces to the distant glimpses of satellites. The final poem, ‘How Do the Dead Walk’, combines mythic reach with acute observation of the familiar, in order to address issues of contemporary violence. It is altogether more dreamlike, even in its tangibly military moments, grasping as it does at phantoms and intermediate plains. Andrew Motion’s expansive new poetry collection is direct in its emotional appeal, ambitious in its scope, all the while retaining the cinematic vision and startling expression that so freshly lit the lines of his last, Essex Clay.

  • Joe Dunthorne: Worship
    FaberBooks
    01:00
    187

    O Positive is the long-awaited debut collection of poetry from Joe Dunthorne, and it has all the appeal of his widely acclaimed fiction. Adopting a sunny, genial tone, Dunthorne lures the reader to darker places, exploring death and dread, failure and regret – the ‘lounge of our suffering’. Often, he catches us off-guard: a ‘whiplash’ effect where poems shift from laughter to slaughter in a moment. Impertinent owls, an immersive theatre troupe, ancient men from the Great War and idiot balloonists – such characters dramatise our human fancies and foibles, joining the protagonist in scenarios both humorously bizarre and all-too-familiar. These performances serve to probe and unpeel the layers of the self – all the way down to the raw.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: Prologue
    FaberBooks
    01:03
    News & Politics
    122

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: The Stage Is Set (1)
    FaberBooks
    02:31
    News & Politics
    73

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: The Stage Is Set (2)
    FaberBooks
    07:04
    News & Politics
    50

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: The Stage Is Set (3)
    FaberBooks
    04:26
    News & Politics
    32

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: The Stage Is Set (4)
    FaberBooks
    03:05
    News & Politics
    29

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Ten Days in Harlem by Simon Hall: The Stage Is Set (5)
    FaberBooks
    02:41
    News & Politics
    23

    Simon Hall reads from the opening of his history book Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. Rising star Simon Hall captures the spirit of the 1960s in ten days that revolutionised the Cold War: Fidel Castro's visit to New York. 'Hall has captured this catalytic moment like no one before. Anyone interested in the "Global Sixties" must read Ten Days in Harlem.' Van E. Gosse, Professor of History, Franklin & Marshall College New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro - champion of the oppressed, scourge of colonialism, and leftist revolutionary - arrives for the opening of the United Nations General Assembly. His visit to the UN represents a golden opportunity to make his mark on the world stage. Fidel's shock arrival in Harlem is met with a rapturous reception from the local African American community. He holds court from the iconic Hotel Theresa as a succession of world leaders, black freedom fighters and counter-cultural luminaries - everyone from Nikita Khrushchev to Gamal Abdel Nasser, Malcolm X to Allen Ginsberg - come calling. Then, during his landmark address to the UN General Assembly - one of the longest speeches in the organisation's history - he promotes the politics of anti-imperialism with a fervour, and an audacity, that makes him an icon of the 1960s. In this unforgettable slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a foundational moment in the trajectory of the Cold War, a turning point in the history of anti-colonial struggle, and a launching pad for the social, cultural and political tumult of the decade that followed.

  • Nicola Upson reads from Sorry For The Dead
    FaberBooks
    01:55
    Audiobooks
    109

    Nicola Upson reads an extract from Sorry for the Dead, which is Longlisted for the CWA Sapere Books Historial Dagger 2020. Summer, 1915: a young woman falls to her death at Charleston Farmhouse on the Sussex Downs. But was it an accident? Twenty years later, Josephine Tey is faced with the accusation that it was murder, and that she was complicit in the crime. Can she clear her name and uncover the truth, exposing the darkest secrets of that apparently idyllic summer? 'Haunting . . . Superlative.' Sunday Times Crime Book of the Month 'A terrific novel.' A. N. Wilson Nicola Upson's debut novel, An Expert in Murder, was the first in a series of crime novels whose main character is Josephine Tey, who - along with Agatha Christie - was one of the masters of Britain's Golden Age of crime writing. The most recent book in the series, Nine Lessons, was shortlisted for the CWA Historical Dagger in 2018. BUY THE BOOK: Waterstones: https://www.waterstones.com/book/sorry-for-the-dead/nicola-upson/9780571337378 Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sorry-Dead-Josephine-Tey-8/dp/0571337376/ Foyles: https://www.foyles.co.uk/witem/fiction-poetry/sorry-for-the-dead,nicola-upson-nicola-upson-9780571337378 Hive: https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Nicola-Upson/Sorry-for-the-Dead/24940143 Ebook: Kindle: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sorry-Dead-Nicola-Upson-ebook/dp/B07V6RM6GK/

  • Matthew Francis: Yellow
    FaberBooks
    01:40
    Audiobooks
    200

    Adventurous and illuminating, Matthew Francis’s new poetry collection is full of flight, air and possibility. Read by the author. Matthew Francis’s latest collection celebrates the richness of nature and of our responses to it. The pleasures of summer are emblazoned in the colourful wings and evocative names of butterflies, while a nocturnal encounter with an earwig becomes a joyous incantation to the ‘witchy-beetle, forkin-robin’ of dialect. His love of history, embodied in his acclaimed Mandeville and The Mabinogi, gives rise to a sequence based on Robert Hooke’s microscopic observations. There are tributes to the poets Basho, Dafydd ap Gwilym and W. S. Graham, to fireworks, apple varieties, and hot toddies. And, in a moving elegy for a friend killed in a parachute accident, Francis shows us a vertiginous vision of a world where even the dead ‘sleep on the wing’.

  • Mary Jean Chan reads Flèche
    FaberBooks
    01:05
    Audiobooks
    451

    Flèche (the French word for ‘arrow’) is an offensive technique commonly used in fencing, a sport of Mary Jean Chan’s young adult years, when she competed locally and internationally for her home city, Hong Kong. This cross-linguistic pun presents the queer, non-white body as both vulnerable (‘flesh’) and weaponised (‘flèche’), and evokes the difficulties of reconciling one’s need for safety alongside the desire to shed one’s protective armour in order to fully embrace the world. Central to the collection is the figure of the poet’s mother, whose fragmented memories of political turmoil in twentieth-century China are sensitively threaded through the book in an eight-part poetic sequence, combined with recollections from Chan’s childhood. As complex themes of multilingualism, queerness, psychoanalysis and cultural history emerge, so too does a richly imagined personal, maternal and national biography. The result is a series of poems that feel urgent and true, dazzling and devastating by turns.

  • Book of the Week: Collusion by Luke Harding
    FaberBooks
    52:46
    Audiobooks
    134

    Collusion by Luke Harding is a gripping exposé about the biggest political scandal of the modern era, and #1 New York Times bestseller. This is an extract of the audiobook, read by Jonathan Aris. Moscow, July 1987. Real-estate tycoon Donald Trump visits Soviet Russia for the first time at the invitation of the government. London, December 2016. Luke Harding meets former MI6 officer Christopher Steele to discuss the president-elect's connections with Russia. Harding follows two leads: money and sex. Washington, January 2017. Steele's explosive dossier alleges that the Kremlin has been 'cultivating, supporting, and assisting' Trump for years and that they have compromising information about him. Trump responds on twitter, 'FAKE NEWS.' In Collusion, award-winning journalist Luke Harding reveals the true nature of Trump's decades-long relationship with Russia and presents the gripping inside story of the dossier. It features exclusive new material and draws on sources from the intelligence community. Harding tells an astonishing story of offshore money, sketchy real-estate deals, a Miss Universe Pageant, mobsters, money laundering, hacking and Kremlin espionage. He shines a light on powerful Russian players like Aras Agalarov, Natalia Veselnitskaya and Sergey Kislyak, whose motivations and instructions may have come from Vladimir Putin himself. The special prosecutor, Robert Mueller, has already indicted several of the American protagonists, including Trump's campaign manager, Paul Manafort. More charges are likely as the crisis engulfs Trump's administration. This audiobook gets to the heart of the biggest political scandal of the modern era. Russia is reshaping the world order to its advantage - this is something that should trouble us all. BUY THE AUDIO: Apple: https://books.apple.com/gb/audiobook/collusion-how-russia-helped-trump-win-white-house-unabridged/id1316120538 Audible: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Collusion-Russia-Helped-Trump-White/dp/B0783QTRJ3/

  • Julia Copus reads Stories
    FaberBooks
    01:07
    Audiobooks
    309

    Taken from Julia Copus’s collection, Girlhood, – a book of transgressed boundaries and seductive veneers. Restlessly inquisitive, it exposes the shifting power balance between things on the verge of becoming and the forces that threaten to destroy them. Reading these poems, we have the sense of encountering a series of filmic installations arranged by episode in a gallery. Lost, censored or disparaged voices speak out from secluded spaces and moments of hidden history: from within a professor’s office and a deserted department store; from kitchens, bedrooms, hallways and upstairs windows; through changing weathers, fidgety shadows and the witching hour. Girlhood concludes with a sequence set in a psychiatric hospital that reimagines Jacques Lacan’s treatment of his most famous case study, Marguerite Pantaine. This dramatic meeting of minds has us questioning who is the more delusional – doctor or patient: like other victims in this exhilarating new collection, Marguerite may initially appear vanquished, but a closer look reveals how little of herself she has really surrendered.

  • Paris by Hope Mirrlees read by Charlotte Rampling and Lambert Wilson
    FaberBooks
    15:59
    Audiobooks
    308

    'An immersive, polyphonic adventure.' Deborah Levy Celebrating 100 years since first publication of 'modernism's lost masterpiece' (Julia Briggs). In just twenty-two pages, Hope Mirrlees combines sensuous psychogeography with modernist avant garde poetics to create a dazzling single-day journey through interwar Paris in the eyes of a jaded flâneuse. Sights, smells, music, gem-encrusted tortoises, shrouded monuments – it's a truly glorious and immersive evocation of Paris in the springtime. The cover of our edition is inspired by Sonia Delaunay's modernist designs, while she was living in Paris in the 1920s (with thanks to Eleanor Crow). The text inside reproduces, in Caslon Old Face type, the layout of the Hogarth Press edition (with thanks to Kate Ward). Deborah Levy summons the spirit of this 'fiercely independent, young and spirited, flawed and brilliant female writer' in her introductory foreword, Julia Briggs's line-by-line commentary unveils the verse's intricate allusions, while Mirrlees's biographer Sandeep Parmar summarises the social and biographical context in her afterword. Hope Mirrlees (1887–1978) was a British translator, poet and novelist. She published three novels in her lifetime, Madeleine: One of Love’s Jansenists (1919), The Counterplot (1924) and the fantasy novel Lud-in-the-Mist (1926); three slim volumes of poetry, which culminated in Moods and Tensions (1976); and A Fly in Amber (1962), a biography of the British antiquarian Sir Robert Bruce Cotton. With thanks to Charlotte Rampling, Lambert Wilson and Director James Lever, © Hope Mirrlees estate

  • Natalie Diaz reads Manhattan Is A Lenape Word
    FaberBooks
    03:12
    Audiobooks
    245

    Manhattan is a Lenape Word Natalie Diaz It is December and we must be brave. The ambulance’s rose of light blooming against the window. Its single siren-cry: Help me. A silk-red shadow unbolting like water through the orchard of her thigh. Her, come—in the green night, a lion. I sleep her bees with my mouth of smoke, dip honey with my hands stung sweet on the darksome hive. Out of the eater I eat. Meaning, She is mine, colony. The things I know aren’t easy: I’m the only Native American on the 8th floor of this hotel or any, looking out any window of a turn-of-the-century building in Manhattan. Manhattan is a Lenape word. Even a watch must be wound. How can a century or a heart turn if nobody asks, Where have all the natives gone? If you are where you are, then where are those who are not here? Not here. Which is why in this city I have many lovers. All my loves are reparations loves. What is loneliness if not unimaginable light and measured in lumens— an electric bill which must be paid, a taxi cab floating across three lanes with its lamp lit, gold in wanting. At 2 a.m. everyone in New York City is empty and asking for someone. Again, the siren’s same wide note: Help me. Meaning, I have a gift and it is my body, made two-handed of gods and bronze. She says, You make me feel like lightning. I say, I don’t ever want to make you feel that white. It’s too late—I can’t stop seeing her bones. I’m counting the carpals, metacarpals of her hand inside me. One bone, the lunate bone, is named for its crescent outline. Lunatus. Luna. Some nights she rises like that in me, like trouble—a slow luminous flux. The streetlamp beckons the lonely coyote wandering West 29th Street by offering its long wrist of light. The coyote answers by lifting its head and crying stars. Somewhere far from New York City, an American drone finds then loves a body—the radiant nectar it seeks through great darkness—makes a candle-hour of it, and burns gently along it, like American touch, an unbearable heat. The siren song returns in me, I sing it across her throat: Am I what I love? Is this the glittering world I’ve been begging for?

  • Ilya Kaminsky – We Lived Happily During The War
    FaberBooks
    01:07
    Audiobooks
    390

    Ilya Kaminsky reads We Lived Happily During the War, from Deaf Republic. We Lived Happily During the War BY ILYA KAMINSKY And when they bombed other people’s houses, we protested but not enough, we opposed them but not enough. I was in my bed, around my bed America was falling: invisible house by invisible house by invisible house. I took a chair outside and watched the sun. In the sixth month of a disastrous reign in the house of money in the street of money in the city of money in the country of money, our great country of money, we (forgive us) lived happily during the war.

  • Faber Book of the Week | A Mind To Murder
    FaberBooks
    01:04:17
    Audiobooks
    121

    A piercing scream, shattering the evening calm, brings Superintendent Adam Dalgliesh hurrying from his literary party to the nearby Steen Psychiatric Clinic, where he discovers the body of a woman sprawled on the basement floor, a chisel thrust through her heart. As Dalgliesh probes beneath the apparently unruffled calm of the clinic, he discovers that many an intrigue lies hidden behind the Georgian terrace's unassuming façade. Professionally, he has never known the taste of failure. Now, for the first time, he feels unsure of his own mastery as he battles to unmask a cool killer who is proving to be his intellectual equal, and who is poised to strike again.A Mind To Murder is the second novel to feature Superintendent Adam Dalgliesh from the bestselling author of Death Comes To Pemberley, Death in Holy Orders and The Children of Men. In 1995 the novel was adapted into a hit film and starred Roy Marsden as the inspector protagonist.