LSE Podcasts tracks on Soundclound

#lsepodcasts

  • The Ballpark | Extra Innings: American Resistance and the 2020 Election: Prof. Dana Fisher Interview
    LSE Podcasts
    28:50
    News & Politics
    480

    On the 6th of October, 2020 Ballpark host Chris Gilson spoke with Professor Dana Fisher about her new book American Resistance: From the Women's March to the Blue Wave, the rise of distributed organizing in the United States, and the impact that Black Lives Matter & climate protests may have on the November 2020 presidential election. Professor Dana Fisher is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland and the Director of the Program for Society and the Environment at the University of Maryland. She is the author of National Governance and the Global Climate Change Regime, Activism, Inc., and her most recent book, American Resistance: From the Women's March to the Blue Wave. Her research focuses on environmental policy, civic participation and activism more broadly. She has written extensively on activism and protest. Contributors: Professor Dana Fisher (Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland, Director of the Program for Society and the Environment at the University of Maryland), Chris Gilson (LSE US Centre)

  • Is perfect the enemy of the possible?
    LSE Podcasts
    17:23
    News & Politics
    857

    To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran about the potential pitfalls of wanting to be perfect. Our society values perfection, but is the concept of perfect really that good for us? The latest episode of LSE IQ explores perfectionism. In this bitesized episode of the LSE IQ podcast, Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. While aspiring to perfection may still be viewed positively by many, Dr Curran’s research reveals that the drive to be the best can potentially do more harm than good. Are the potential downsides worth it when balanced against the possible achievements that can come from being a perfectionist? In a discussion which explores the realities of being a perfectionist, we ask, is perfection really worth it? Contributors   Dr Thomas Curran https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Tom-Curran   Research  A test of social learning and parent socialization perspectives on the development of perfectionism by Thomas Curran, Daniel J Madigan, Andrew P Hill and Annett Victoria Stornæs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339433945_A_test_of_social_learning_and_parent_socialization_perspectives_on_the_development_of_perfectionism Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 by Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/101352/1/Curran_Hill2018.pdf

  • Coming Soon: The Politics of Race in American Film – with Dr. Clive James Nwonka
    LSE Podcasts
    07:19
    News & Politics
    484

    In this special episode of the Ballpark we’re giving you a preview of our upcoming new podcast series, The Politics of Race in American Film. Chris Gilson interviews the podcast’s host, Dr. Clive James Nwonka, about what you can expect from the series, why film is such a useful lens for understanding race and society, and why taking a close look at film is especially relevant today.  Dr. Clive James Nwonka is a Visiting Fellow in the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. His research is situated at the intersections of contemporary realism and film policy, with particular interests in Black British film, international cinema and American Independent film. His published research includes writings on contemporary social realism, Black British cinema, film and architecture, and diversity policy. He is the co-editor of Black Film British Cinema II and author of the forthcoming book, Black Boys: The Aesthetics of British Urban Cinema, which will be out later this year.  Contributors: Dr. Clive James Nwonka (Visiting Fellow in the International Inequalities Institute at LSE); Chris Gilson (LSE US Centre)

  • The Ballpark | Extra Innings: The Great Debate Over Race in America: Professor Nicholas Buccola
    LSE Podcasts
    01:24:01
    News & Politics
    630

    On the 30th of January 2020, Professor Nicholas Buccola joined the LSE US Centre for the event, “James Baldwin vs. William F. Buckley: The Great Debate over Race in America”. The event was chaired by Dr. Clive James Nwonka, an LSE Fellow in Film Studies within the Department of Sociology and affiliate of the US Centre. At the event, Professor Buccola spoke about his new book The Fire Is upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America. He revisited the historic debate between these two thinkers, the controversies that followed their meeting, and how their clash continues to illuminate America’s racial divide today. Professor Nicholas Buccola is the Elizabeth and Morris Glicksman Chair in Political Science at Linfield College, McMinnville, Oregon. He is a is a writer, lecturer, and teacher who specializes in the area of American political thought. He is the author of The Fire Is upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America (Princeton University, 2019) and The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty (New York University Press, 2012). Contributors: Professor Nicholas Buccola (Elizabeth and Morris Glicksman Chair in Political Science at Linfield College); Dr. Clive James Nwonka (LSE Fellow in Film Studies, Department of Sociology)

  • Can we afford the super-rich?
    LSE Podcasts
    35:32
    News & Politics
    1,820

    To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. The coronavirus crisis has devastated economies and brought existing inequalities into sharper focus. Will it result in higher taxes on income and wealth, as we saw after the Great Depression and WWII? Or will the top 1 per cent continue to pull away from the rest of society? Exploring the question, ‘Can we afford the super-rich?’, Joanna Bale talks to Paul Krugman, Andy Summers and Luna Glucksberg. Research links: Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future by Paul Krugman. Capital Gains and UK Inequality by Arun Advani and Andy Summers. A gendered ethnography of elites by Luna Glucksberg.

  • How can we tackle air pollution?
    LSE Podcasts
    45:33
    News & Politics
    1,083

    To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. Seven million people die of air pollution, worldwide, every year. This episode of LSE IQ asks how this invisible killer can be tackled. Sue Windebank speaks to Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah about her campaigning work for both clean air and a new inquest into the causes of her daughter’s death. In 2013, her daughter Ella Roberta died from a rare and severe form of asthma – she was just nine years old. According to an expert report there was a "real prospect” that without unlawful levels of air pollution near their home, Ella would not have died. As well as the impact on health, the episode looks at the effects of air pollution on crime and education. It also examines air pollution on the London Underground, forest fires and clean cooking. Addressing these issue are: Dr Ute Collier, Head of Energy at Practical Action; Dr Sefi Roth, Assistant Professor of Environmental Economics at LSE; and Dr Thomas Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Geography at LSE. Contributors Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Dr Ute Collier Dr Sefi Roth Dr Thomas Smith Research ‘Crime is in the Air: The Contemporaneous Relationship between Air Pollution and Crime’ by Malvina Brody, Sefi Roth and Lutz Sager, a discussion paper by IZA Institute of Labor Economics. ‘The Long-Run Economic Consequences of High-Stakes Examinations: Evidence from Transitory Variation in Pollution’ by Avraham Ebenstein, Victor Lavy and Sefi Roth in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. ‘Spatial variability of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) on the London Underground network’ by Brynmor M Saunders, James D Smith, T.E.L Smith, David Green and B Barratt in the journal Urban Climate. ‘Review of emissions from smouldering peat fires and their contribution to regional haze episodes’ Yuqi Hu, Nieves Fernandez-Anez, T.E.L Smith and Guillermo Rein in the International Journal of Wildland Fire.

  • Out Of The Vat: Philip Goff
    LSE Podcasts
    31:00
    News & Politics
    510

    Philip Goff is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Durham University. In this episode, Philip discusses everything from panpsychism and the problem of consciousness to Philip Pullman and talking philosophy on the high seas… For more information about Out of The Vat, please visit www.lse.ac.uk/philosophy/out-of-the-vat/

  • The Common Room | More Than A Pivot
    LSE Podcasts
    41:13
    News & Politics
    688

    Sean Michael Morris, Sara Camacho Felix, Dustin Hosseini, and Lee-Ann Sequeira further explore the uncertainties faced by staff and students in the shift towards online learning and assessment

  • The Ballpark | Extra Innings: Russian Trolls and the 2016 Election: Prof Kathleen Jamieson interview
    LSE Podcasts
    33:46
    News & Politics
    649

    The LSE US Centre’s Chris Gilson is joined for this Extra Inning by Professor Kathleen Jamieson. In this interview, Professor Jamieson talks about the impact of Russian interference on the 2016 US Presidential election, the tactics used to influence voters, and what we should be thinking about ahead of the 2020 Presidential election. Professor Kathleen Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of its Annenberg Public Policy Center. She is also the author of Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President - What We Don't, Can't, and Do Know. You can also find audio of Professor Jamieson’s LSE US Centre event, “Russian Hackers, Trolls and #DemocracyRIP,” on this feed. Contributors: Professor Kathleen Jamieson (Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania); Chris Gilson (LSE US Centre)

  • Is big data good for our health?
    LSE Podcasts
    39:41
    News & Politics
    1,239

    To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. With more and more information about us available electronically and online, this episode of LSE IQ asks, ‘Is big data good for our health?’ Advances in bio-medical technologies, along with electronic health records and the information we generate through our mobile phones, Smart Watches or Fit bits, our social media posts and search engine queries, mean that there is a torrent of information about our bodies, our health and our diseases out there. Alongside this, the tremendous growth in computing power and data storage means that this ‘Big Data’ can be stored and aggregated and then analysed by sophisticated algorithms for connections, comparisons and insights. The promise of all of this is that big data will create opportunities for medical breakthroughs, help tailor medical interventions to us as individuals and create technologies that will speed up and improve healthcare. And, of course, during the COVID-19 pandemic we’ve also seen some countries use data, generated from people’s mobile phones, to track and trace the disease. All of this poses opportunities for the tech giants and others who want to be part of the goldrush for our data - and to then sell solutions back to us. What are the risks in handing over our most personal data? Will it allow big data to deliver on its hype? And is it a fair exchange? In this episode, Oliver Johnson speaks to Dr Leeza Osipenko, Senior Lecturer in Practice in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; Professor Barbara Prainsack, Professor of Comparative Policy Analysis at the University of Vienna and Professor Sociology at King’s College London; Dr Stephen L. Roberts, LSE Fellow in Global Health Policy in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; and Dr James Somauroo, founder of the healthtech agency somX and presenter of The Health-Tech Podcast. Research Blockchain’s potential to improve clinical trials by Leeza Osipenko Big Data, Algorithmic Governmentality and the Regulation of Pandemic Risk by Stephen Roberts Personalized Medicine: Empowered Patients in the 21st Century? by Barbara Prainsack Contributors Dr Leeza Osipenko Professor Barbara Prainsack Dr Stephen L. Roberts Dr James Somauroo

  • Strategic Climate Litigation: insights from global experience [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:26:45
    News & Politics
    510

    Speaker(s): Irum Ahsan, Michael Burger, Lord Carnwath, Dr Joana Setzer, James Thornton | Climate litigation has been used as a strategic tool to advance climate policy goals for at least three decades. As the number of cases addressing the causes and consequences of climate change and the public interest in such litigation has increased, so has public interest in such litigation. Today, climate litigation is widely considered to be a governance mechanism to address climate change. In this webinar, a panel of experts and practitioners will discuss the extent to which climate change litigation is driving governments to adopt more ambitious climate policies and inducing a change of behaviour among major GHG emitting corporations. The panel will also explore potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on future litigation cases. Irum Ahsan is Principal Counsel, Law and Policy Reform in the Office of the General Counsel at the Asian Development Bank. Michael Burger (@ProfBurger) is Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. Robert Carnwath is a former Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE. James Thornton (@JamesThorntonCE) is Chief Executive Officer of ClientEarth and Visiting Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. Robert Falkner (@robert_falkner) is Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation

  • Governments in the Crisis: what do we expect of them? what do they expect of us? [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:27:32
    News & Politics
    511

    Speaker(s): Professor George Gerapetritis, Professor Bo Rothstein, Professor Amy Verdun | From strict lockdowns and school shutdowns to fostering self-responsibility, governments have taken different paths to fight the pandemic. Some of these differences seem consistent with different national traditions or cultural frames. Yet, governments have also achieved very different results in managing the pandemic that contradict images of government performance. What should we make of this? Are our stereotypes wrong? At the same time, the economic impact of the pandemic seems to be transforming assumptions about fiscal discipline and the role of the state in the economy. Are we converging around a new activism for the state? Are we sharing a paradigmatic shift? Are north-south differences in Europe disappearing? What should we expect of our governments now? George Gerapetritis is the Minister of State, Hellenic Republic. He is a Professor of Constitutional Law at the Faculty of Law of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied in Athens (LL.B.), Edinburgh (LL.M.) and Oxford (D.Phil), has been a visiting fellow at the University of Oxford and the Hellenic Observatory, LSE. He has taught European and comparative constitutional law and history in many universities worldwide. He has published 8 books and more than 100 articles in 3 languages. Bo Rothstein holds the August Röhss Chair in Political Science at University of Gothenburg and is the co-founder of the Quality of Government (QoG) Institute at this department. Rothstein took his PhD in Political Science at Lund University (1986). Prior to the above appointment he worked a researcher at the Department of Government at Uppsala University. During 2016 and 2017 he served as Professor of Government and Public Policy at University of Oxford. Amy Verdun (@Amy_Verdun) is Professor in European Politics and Political Economy, Leiden University. Prior to this appointment she was for 21 years in the Department of Political Science of the University of Victoria (UVic), BC Canada where she was Full Professor since 2005. At UVic she served as Founder and Director of the European Studies Program (1997-2005); Graduate Advisor (2007-2009); and as Chair (Head) of the Department (2010-2013). Her research deals with European integration, governance and policy-making, political economy, as well as comparisons between the EU and Canada. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. He has held visiting positions at the University of Minnesota; New York University; Harvard University; and, the European University Institute (Firenze). Before LSE, he held academic posts at the Universities of Stirling and Bradford. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Peace and the Pandemic [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:34:45
    News & Politics
    439

    Speaker(s): Helen Clark, Helena Puig Larrauri, Dr Mareike Schomerus | What are the consequences of the pandemic for countries affected by conflict and fragility? Will coronavirus contribute to the further escalation or new outbreaks of conflict? How can the international community –governments, international organisations, regional actors and civil society develop a peace-building response to COVID-19? Helen Clark, head of the United Nations Development Programme 2009-2017, and former Prime Minister of New Zealand leads an expert panel to discuss the development and security risks of the current pandemic. Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. She was also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the Heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. In 2019 Helen Clark became patron of The Helen Clark Foundation. She is an active member of many global organisations. Helena Puig Larrauri (@HelenaPuigL) is a Co-founder and Director of Build Up, a non-profit that works to identify and apply innovative practices to prevent conflict and tackle polarization. She is a governance and peacebuilding professional with over a decade of experience advising and supporting UN agencies, multi-lateral organisations and NGOs working in conflict contexts and polarized environments. She specializes in the integration of digital technology and innovation processes to peace processes, and has written extensively on this subject matter. She is also an Ashoka Fellow. Helena holds a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University and a Masters in Public Policy (Economics) from Princeton University. Mareike Schomerus is Vice President of the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Nairobi. Prior to that she was the Director of Programme Politics and Governance and the Research Director of the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) at odi in London. She is a widely published researcher with a body of work on violent conflict, political contestation and peace processes in South Sudan and Uganda and across borders, as well as behavioural insights in post-conflict recovery. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science and Master’s Degrees from Columbia University and the University of Bremen. Mary Martin is Director of the UN Business and Human Security Initiative at LSE IDEAS. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response.

  • The Ballpark | Extra Innings: African Americans in a White House: Prof Leah Wright Rigueur Event
    LSE Podcasts
    01:15:41
    News & Politics
    618

    On the 5th of March 2020, Professor Leah Wright Rigueur joined the LSE US Centre for the event “African Americans in a 'White' House: Presidential Politics, Race, and The Pursuit of Power.” At the event, using one of the most outrageous scandals in modern American political history as a case study - the Housing and Urban Development Scandal (HUD) of the 1980s and 1990s which saw political officials steal billions in federal funding set aside for low-income housing residents – Professor Leah Wright Rigueur told the complex story of the transformation of Black politics and the astonishing racial politics of presidential administrations that have paved the way for patterns of political misconduct that have continued into the present. This seminar was chaired by Professor Imaobong Umoren, Assistant Professor at the Department of International History at LSE. The event was part of the 'Race and Gender in US Politics in Historical and Contemporary Perspective' seminar series organized by the LSE United States Centre. Professor Leah Wright Rigueur is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harry S. Truman Associate Professor of American History at Brandeis University. She is the author of The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power and is currently working on the book manuscript Mourning in America: Black Men in a White House. You can also find audio of a one-on-one conversation with Professor Wright Rigueur on this feed.

    Contributors: Professor Leah Wright Rigueur (Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harry S. Truman Associate Professor of American History at Brandeis University); Professor Imaobong Umoren (Assistant Professor at the Department of International History at LSE)

  • Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading? [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:25:48
    News & Politics
    527

    Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Dr Meredith Crowley, Dr Adam Marshall, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Tony Travers | In the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. This expert panel will assess where we are with the negotiations and where we might be heading. Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Meredith Crowley (@MeredithCrowle1) is a Reader in International Economics at the University of Cambridge, a Senior Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe (UKCE) and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR - London). Adam Marshall (@BCCAdam) is Director General of British Chambers of Commerce. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • The New Authoritarianism: COVID-19 and the challenges facing democracy [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:36:49
    News & Politics
    483

    Speaker(s): Dr Guy Aitchison, Dr Luke Cooper, Dr Nadine El-Enany, Professor Shalini Randeria | Over the last decade political authoritarianism has been on the rise across the globe. The ‘authoritarian wave’ has touched most continents and regions. So even before the crisis unleashed by Coronavirus many peoples across the world were resisting rising authoritarianism, nationalism and racism. Coronavirus has often been talked of as a historical rupture, igniting system change. ‘We will not go back’ to the pre-crisis world is the clarion call of the current moment. Yet, the nature of the new world being born is still far from certain. And while opportunities for progressive political change undoubtedly exist, this new historical conjuncture provides considerable opportunities for the further embedding of authoritarianism and new attacks on democracy. Warning of these dangers a new report, Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism, co-authored by Dr Guy Aitchison and Dr Luke Cooper, surveys the rise of anti-democratic forces and assesses their reaction to these extraordinary recent developments. Moving between the global picture and British domestic politics, the report argues that a new state-dependent capitalism is coalescing in response to the crisis and it ‘fits’ all too organically with the agenda of the authoritarian populists. Guy Aitchison (@GuyAitchison) is Lecturer in Politics and International Studies at Loughborough University and a co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Luke Cooper (@lukecooper100) is a consultant researcher in the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit and co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Nadine El-Enany (@NadineElEnany) is Senior Lecturer in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Race and Law at Birkbeck Law School. She is author of (B)ordering Britain: law, race and empire. Shalini Randeria (@IWM_Vienna) is the Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. Mary Kaldor (@KaldorM) is the Director of the LSE Conflict and Civil Society Research unit. Her most recent book is Global Security Cultures. Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit (@LSE_CCS) - Understanding conflict and violence in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Bridging the gap between citizens and policymakers. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Life After COVID-19: challenges and policy response [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:29:23
    News & Politics
    560

    Speaker(s): Michelle Bachelet, Helen Clark, Matteo Renzi, Kevin Rudd, Minouche Shafik | Listen to this discussion on life after COVID-19 with the former leaders of Australia, Chile, Italy and New Zealand. Michelle Bachelet (@mbachelet) is the current United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Ms Bachelet was elected President of Chile on two occasions (2006–2010 and 2014–2018). She was the first female president of Chile. She also served as Health Minister (2000-2002) as well as Chile’s and Latin America’s first female Defence Minister (2002–2004). Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. Matteo Renzi (@matteorenzi) has been the Senator of the electoral college of Florence since 2018. In his political experience he has served as Prime Minister of Italy from February 2014 to December 2016 and as Mayor of Florence from June 2009 to February 2014. Kevin Rudd (@MrKRudd) served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister (2007-2010, 2013) and as Foreign Minister (2010-2012). He led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis—the only major developed economy not to go into recession—and helped found the G20. Mr. Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York as its inaugural President in January 2015. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Implications of the COVID-19 Crisis for Disability Policy [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:28:10
    News & Politics
    388

    Speaker(s): Baroness Campbell, Neil Crowther, Clenton Farquharson, Liz Sayce | This panel event will explore the potential implications for disability policy of these possible futures under the political and socio-cultural themes. It will explore questions including whether the ‘vulnerability’ framing is likely to inform future policy and what the implications are for disabled people’s lives, communities and activism. There has been a shift in many countries over recent decades to position disability policy as an issue of rights and equality: the aim is social and economic participation, rather than a more paternalistic concern for care and containment. This found its expression in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by 181 countries by 2020. Some states, for instance Australia, have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by creating plans framed precisely in terms of disabled people’s rights to equal treatment (equality in healthcare, employment and the like). Others, like the UK, have reverted to an older framing of ‘vulnerable’ people, those deemed to require protection and practical assistance: this has met with some objections, from over-70s arguing they are contributors to society not just in need of ‘protection’ and from disabled people denied goods like help with shopping if they are not ‘vulnerable’ enough. A number of organisations have looked at the possible ‘new normals’ that could arise post-covid crisis and NESTA has pulled together projections from different sources under a number of themes. Jane Campbell (@BnsJaneCampbell) is an independent Crossbench Member of the House of Lords and disability rights campaigner. Neil Crowther (@neilmcrowther) is an independent expert on equality, human rights and social change with a particular interest in working to secure the rights of disabled people. Clenton Farquharson (@ClentonF), MBE, is a disabled person with lived experience of health and social care, Chair of the Think Local Act Personal partnership board, and member of the Coalition for Collaborative Care. Liz Sayce (@lizsayce) is a JRF Practitioner Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

  • Religious Communities under COVID-19: the first pandemic of the postsecular age? [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:35:04
    News & Politics
    547

    Speaker(s): Professor Azza M. Karam, Elizabeth Oldfield, Dr James Walters | Faith communities have been prominent in public discourse since the beginning of the pandemic. Religious gatherings have been identified as a major sites of transmission raising tensions in many countries between believers and the secular authorities seeking to regulate them. But many people are also searching for meaning and faith groups have adapted to online worship and support to meet the need for hope and connection in the face of suffering and isolation. The pandemic seems to be fanning the flames of some existing religious tensions. But there are also new opportunities for a positive role for faith in the public sphere. How will COVID-19 reshape the religious landscape in the future? Azza M. Karam (@Mansoura1968) is Secretary General of Religions for Peace International; Professor of religion and development at the Vrije Universiteit, and lead facilitator for the United Nations’ Strategic Learning Exchanges on Religion, Development and Diplomacy. Former senior advisor on culture at the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA); coordinator/chair of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Religion and Development; senior policy research advisor at the United Nations Development Program in the Regional Bureau for Arab States; and president of the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations. Elizabeth Oldfield is Director of Theos. She appears regularly in the media, including BBC One, Sky News, the World Service, and writing in The Financial Times. She is a regular conference speaker and chair. Before joining Theos in August 2011, Elizabeth worked for BBC TV and radio. She has an MA in Theology from King’s College London James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and its Religion and Global Society Research Unit. He leads the team in the centre’s mission to promote religious literacy and interfaith leadership through student programmes and global engagement, along with research into the role of religion in world affairs. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice in the Department of International Relations and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. Katerina Dalacoura is Associate Professor in International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2015-16, she was British Academy Mid-Career Fellow and in 2016-19 she participated in a project on the ‘Middle East and North Africa Regional Architecture’, sponsored by the European Commission under the auspices of Horizon 2020 (2016-19).

  • Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:34:15
    News & Politics
    365

    Speaker(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Wolfgang Münchau, Vicky Pryce | What will be the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Brexit? More particularly, how might it affect the strategy and interests of the UK as it negotiates a longer-term relationship with the EU27? What if the timelines change? This panel of experts will consider different scenarios for what might happen and what they might mean. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Wolfgang Münchau (@EuroBriefing) is Director of Eurointelligence and a columnist for the Financial Times. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term.