LSE Podcasts tracks on Soundclound

#lsepodcasts

  • January 31, 1953 and 9/11: living with risk [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:24:18
    News & Politics
    201

    Speaker(s): Professor Paul Embrechts | In its broad interpretation, “risk” is omnipresent in modern society. What does science, in particular mathematics, have to offer in a societal discourse on the topic? During the night of January 31 - February 1, 1953, a heavy winter storm battered the coastal areas of South West Holland and South East England killing over 2000 people. As a consequence, the Dutch started their famous Delta project. Paul Embrechts will discuss some of the scientific discourse related to the ensuing dike building process. The Twin Towers attack of 9/11 yields a very different kind of risk which will be contrasted with the flood event. Some methodological links to the financial crisis of 2006-2008 will be highlighted. The talk concludes with a discussion on the public communication and understanding of risk and the need for more interdisciplinary research. Paul Embrechts is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) where he taught insurance and financial mathematics. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this

  • From 1919 to 2019: pivotal lessons from Versailles [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:32:17
    News & Politics
    180

    Speaker(s): Professor Barry Buzan, Professor Margaret MacMillan, Professor David Stevenson, Professor Linda Yueh | A panel of distinguished scholars will here discuss the legacy of the First World War, the Versailles Peace Treaty which followed, and why the treaty has been so hotly debated ever since by critics and defenders alike. This event will also mark the relaunch of John Maynard Keynes’s justly famous The Economic Consequences of the Peace, first published in December 1919 and now republished with a new, definitive introduction by Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities, and the University of International Relations in Beijing; a Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS; and a Fellow of the British Academy. Margaret MacMillan became the fifth Warden of St Antony’s College in July 2007, and stepped down in October 2017. Prior to taking on the Wardenship, Professor MacMillan was Provost of Trinity College and professor of History at the University of Toronto. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His main fields of interests lie in international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. She is Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School as well as Associate Fellow (Global Economy and Finance Department & U.S. and the Americas Programme) at Chatham House and was Visiting Professor of Economics at Peking University. She is a widely published author and Editor of the Routledge Economic Growth and Development book series. Her latest book, The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today is The Times's Best Business Books of the Year. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVersailles

  • Understanding Chilean Unrest: inequalities, social conflict and political change in contemporary Chile [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:30:26
    News & Politics
    195

    Speaker(s): Professor Emmanuelle Barozet, Dr Diana Kruger | Why has Chile been experiencing its larger protests since the return to democracy? What is behind the demands of its citizens? It’s been just over a month of continuous protests in Chile. What began as a challenge to metro fare hikes has become a general outcry, questioning structural inequalities in Chile. Traditionally perceived as the most stable country in the Latin American region, Chile is now challenging the way its model has worked in the last 40 years. From how education, housing, pensions, or health services operate, to even change the current constitution inherited from Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990). Drawing from the researched done by COES, this discussion will examine the causes and consequences of the recent protests, as well as possible routes ahead. Emmanuelle Barozet is a Full Professor at the University of Chile and Associate Researcher of the COES. Diana Kruger is an Associate Professor at Adolfo Ibañez University and Associate Researcher of the COES. Kirsten Sehnbruch (@KirstenSehn) is British Academy Global Professor and Distinguished Policy Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

  • How Freedom of Choice Influences Well-being [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:24:11
    News & Politics
    199

    Speaker(s): Professor Simona Botti | Does choice freedom always enhance satisfaction? Lab experiments help tackle this question, but when should they be used and how have techniques evolved over time? Hear from Simona Botti, Professor of Marketing at London Business School, as she explores the pros and cons of using lab experiments to explain human behaviour around decision-making and choice. Laboratory experiments are one of the many tools available to researchers to help them understand the consequences of making free choices. They can be used in isolation, or in combination with other methods. Simona will draw on practical examples from her own research into perceived personal control and choice freedom. She will share some of the lessons she has learned and provide insight into how experimental research has evolved over time. Simona Botti is Professor of Marketing at the London Business School. She joined LBS in 2007 after two years as Assistant Professor of Marketing at the S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. She received an undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Bocconi University in Milan, Italy, and a MBA and PhD in Marketing from the University of Chicago. Professor Botti’s research focuses on consumer behaviour and decision making, with particular emphasis on the psychological processes underlying perceived personal control and how exercising control (freedom of choice, power, information) influence consumers’ satisfaction and well-being. Her work has been published in leading psychology and consumer behaviour journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Psychological Science. She is Associate Editor at Journal of Consumer Psychology and Journal of Consumer Research. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE's Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChoices

  • French Muslims in Perspective: nationalism, post-colonialism and marginalisation under the Republic [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:26:29
    News & Politics
    168

    Speaker(s): Dr Fiona Adamson, Dr Joseph Downing | Joseph Downing will present his latest book on Muslims in France in a comparative social, political and media perspective. Fiona Adamson is Reader in International Relations at SOAS. Joseph Downing (@JosephDowning1) is Fellow in Nationalism in the European Institute, LSE and author of French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to French Muslims in Perspective. Dr. Angelo Martelli is an Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

  • French Muslims in Perspective: nationalism, post-colonialism and marginalisation under the Republic [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:26:29
    News & Politics
    162

    Speaker(s): Dr Fiona Adamson, Dr Joseph Downing | Joseph Downing will present his latest book on Muslims in France in a comparative social, political and media perspective. Fiona Adamson is Reader in International Relations at SOAS. Joseph Downing (@JosephDowning1) is Fellow in Nationalism in the European Institute, LSE and author of French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to French Muslims in Perspective. Dr. Angelo Martelli is an Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

  • Universal Basic Income and Universal Basic Services: the case for radical change [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:26:56
    News & Politics
    352

    Speaker(s): Anna Coote, Professor Louise Haagh | What are the arguments for Universal Basic Income and for Universal Basic Services? How do they relate to each other and what might the difficulties be? Anna Coote is Principle Fellow at the New Economics Foundation. Louise Haagh is Professor in Politics at the University of York. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.

  • Understanding Scientific Understanding [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:24:44
    News & Politics
    467

    Speaker(s): Professor Henk W de Regt | Lakatos Award winner Henk W de Regt will deliver his lecture on his book Understanding Scientific Understanding. The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous five years. Henk W de Regt (@RegtHenk) is Professor of Philosophy of Natural Sciences, Institute for Science in Society, Radboud University Nijmegen. Roman Frigg is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, Director of the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS), and Co-Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Time Series (CATS) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELakatosAward

  • Do Clothes Maketh the Human? [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:18:41
    News & Politics
    314

    Speaker(s): Professor Shahidha Bari, Yashka Moore, Professor Heather Widdows | Does fashion allow us to express our individuality or is it a case of the Emperor’s new clothing? Can we judge a book by its cover or is beauty just another manifestation of sexist and racist ideals? Does is even make sense to think of our judgements about beauty as being ethically right or wrong? Whether you wear your heart on your sleeve for fashion or think beauty should be given the boot, join us to discuss the cultural, political, and philosophical dimensions of fashion and beauty. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Professor of Fashion Cultures, UAL and author of Dressed. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Dressed. Yashka Moore (@YASHKAMOORE) is a fashion designer. Heather Widdows (@ProfWiddows) is John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, University of Birmingham and author of Perfect Me. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Perfect Me. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum

  • The Case for the Green New Deal [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:21:42
    News & Politics
    278

    Speaker(s): Dr Ann Pettifor | To protect the systems that sustain life on earth, we need to do more than just reimagine the economy – we have to change everything. From one of the original thinkers of the program that helped ignite the US Green New Deal campaign, Ann Pettifor explains how we can afford what we can do. We have done it before – and can do it again. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the Director of Prime, an Honorary Research Fellow at City University, a Research Associate at SOAS and a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation. Her new book is The Case for the Green New Deal. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Case for the Green New Deal. Sam Fankhauser is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPettifor This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

  • The Future of Football in Europe: access and sustainability [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:34:25
    News & Politics
    393

    Speaker(s): Alasdair Bell, Umberto Gandini, Ebru Koksal, Gabriele Marcotti | Football is the world’s most popular sport; Europe is the continent with the biggest leagues and home to FIFA and UEFA, the most powerful governing bodies in the sport. A panel of high profile experts from the world of journalism, elite clubs, regulatory bodies, and playing the game will discuss issues of access and equality, financial sustainability, and the best ways of making the game future-proof. Alasdair Bell is Deputy Secretary General of FIFA. Umberto Gandini (@UmbertoGandini) is Vice Chairman of the European Club Association; former CEO of AS Roma and former CEO of AC Milan. Ebru Koksal is Chair of Women in Football and Former FIFA and UEFA Consultant. Gabriele Marcotti (@Marcotti) is Senior Writer for ESPN and a correspondent for Italian sports newspaper Corriere dello Sport. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

  • Britain and the Welfare State in the 21st Century: a more or less "irresponsible society"? [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:31:59
    News & Politics
    371

    Speaker(s): Professor John Hills, Dr Sonia Exley, Professor Howard Glennerster | In November 1959, Richard Titmuss, Head of the then Department of Social Science and Administration (now Social Policy) at LSE, gave a lecture on ‘The Irresponsible Society’. In it he pointed to the features of Britain in the late 1950s that added up to irresponsibility: the power of unaccountable financial interests; the way ‘welfare for the better-off’ undermined social security; the view of education simply as economic investment; irresponsible newspapers; and the tolerance of inequality. Sixty years on from the lecture John Hills, Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE will discuss how we might judge today’s society by similar – and new – criteria. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Sonia Exley is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. Howard Glennerster is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Anne West is Professor of Education Policy in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrresponsibleSociety

  • Despotic Data: how authoritarian regimes are driving technology and innovation [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:26:19
    News & Politics
    390

    Speaker(s): Professor Noam Yuchtman | Data has become crucial in the production of our goods and services, particularly when it comes to the production of new technology and innovation such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Access to data is often a bottleneck in the development of AI and ML. Whilst authoritarian regimes are considered to hinder innovation, they benefit from having access to large amounts of data which in the democratic world depends on strict laws and cultural perceptions around privacy. Hear from Noam Yuchtman, recipient of the British Academy’s Global Professorship and Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE, as he explains the reasons why authoritarian regimes – such as China – are becoming world leaders in technology, innovation and artificial intelligence. Noam Yuchtman is Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE's Department of Management. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and School Professor, Department of Economics, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDespoticData This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

  • The Common Room | Remain, leave, or teach?
    LSE Podcasts
    30:12
    486
  • Mobilising for Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: a global mothers' campaign [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:30:09
    News & Politics
    382

    Speaker(s): Sahraa Karimi, Anne-Claire de Liedekerke, Staffan de Mistura, Rahela Sidiqi, Marika Theros | As talks between the US and Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, mothers are mobilising inside and outside the country to hold on to their right to educate their daughters. Sahraa Karimi is a film director living in Afghanistan. She comes from the 2nd generation of refugees who fled Afghanistan for a new life in Iran. Sahraa has received huge acclaim for her fiction feature debut film "Hava, Maryam, Ayesha” that had its world premiere at the recent Venice Film Festival. Shot entirely in Kabul with Afghan actors, the film reflects Karimi’s desire to “go beyond [Western] clichés, and to find new stories, new perspectives” about life as an Afghan woman. Anne-Claire de Liedekerke (@MMM4Mothers) is President of Make Mothers Matter - MMM is an international NGO that believes in the power of mothers to make the world a better place and supports the worldwide campaign in solidarity with Afghan mothers. Staffan de Mistura is Former Under-Secretary-General & UN Special Envoy for Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Lebanon. Rahela Sidiqi (@FarkhundaTrust) is Founding Director of Farkhunda Trust for Afghan Women’s Education. Marika Theros (@meeksas) is Research Fellow at the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, LSE. The Conflict and Civil Society Unit ( @LSE_CCS) builds on the work of the Civil Society and Human Security unit and was renamed in 2017 to reflect the changing focus of the research being undertaken. The core concern of the unit remains the desire to better understand the ways in which ordinary people seek to shape the decisions that affect their lives, with a particular focus on those experiencing conflict, prolonged violence, or war. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMothers

  • "We, the People?" Some Thoughts from Our Past on Contemporary European Populism [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:31:56
    News & Politics
    295

    Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | What can history contribute to an understanding of contemporary European populism, which is now as much in power as insurgent? Is this just a reprise of what we have seen before, or something that reveals deeper problems with liberal democracy and capitalism in the post-financial crisis era? The lecture will focus on continental Europe with Brexit Britain, joining Putin’s Russia in the second lecture, taking place in January. Professor Michael Burleigh is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS and Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

  • Women vs Capitalism: why we can't have it all in a free market economy [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:28:23
    News & Politics
    275

    Speaker(s): Vicky Pryce | The free market as we know it cannot produce gender equality. This is the bold but authoritative argument of Vicky Pryce, the government’s former economics chief. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Vicky's recent posts have included: Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting; Director General for Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); and Joint Head of the UK Government Economics Service where she was responsible for evidence based policy and for encouraging measures that promoted greater productivity in the UK economy. She had previously been Partner and Chief Economist at KPMG and earlier held chief economist positions in banking and the oil sector. Vicky co-founded GoodCorporation, a company set up to promote corporate social responsibility. At various stages in her career she has been on the Council of the Royal Economic Society, on the Council of the University of Kent, on the board of trustees at the RSA, on the Court of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a fellow of the Society of Business Economists, on the Executive Committee and the Council of the IFS, an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Visiting Professor at the Cass Business School, a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, Adjunct Professor at Imperial College and Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

  • Sovereignty as Responsibility [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:04:15
    News & Politics
    249

    Speaker(s): Professor Jennifer Welsh | At the annual Martin Wight memorial lecture, Professor Jennifer Welsh will talk about Sovereignty as Responsibility, previewing her new book on this theme. The event will be preceded by a drinks reception from 6.30pm in The Garrick (downstairs). All are welcome. Jennifer M. Welsh is the incoming Canada 150 Research Chair in Global Governance and Security at McGill University (Montreal, Canada). She was previously Professor and Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and Professor in International Relations at the University of Oxford, where she co-founded the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict. From 2013-2016, she served as the Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon, on the Responsibility to Protect. Karen E Smith is a Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). The International Relations (IR) Department (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWightMemorial

  • Citing Africa #9 | Increasing the representation of Africa-based authors in international journals
    LSE Podcasts
    36:52
    News & Politics
    564

    The final episode explores current efforts to increase the representation of Africa-based authors in international journals and what more can be done. We address the importance of publishing in these journals for career opportunities, and what declining rates of acceptance for Africa-based academics means for scholarship from the continent. Speakers: Ryan Briggs, Christine Feak, Henrike Florusbosch, Felix Mukwiza Ndahinda, Andy Nobes, Naomi Pendle

  • Unbound: how inequality constricts our economy and what we can do about it [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:24:37
    News & Politics
    375

    Speaker(s): Heather Boushey | Do we have to choose between equality and prosperity? Many think that reducing economic inequality would require such heavy-handed interference with market forces that it would stifle economic growth. Heather Boushey, one of Washington’s most influential economic voices, insists nothing could be further from the truth. Presenting cutting-edge economics with journalistic verve, she shows how rising inequality has become a drag on growth and an impediment to a competitive United States marketplace for employers and employees alike. Boushey makes this case with a clear, accessible tour of the best of contemporary economic research, while also injecting a passion for her subject gained through years of research into the economics of work–life conflict and policy work in the trenches of federal government. Unbound exposes deep problems in the U.S. economy, but its conclusion is optimistic. We can preserve the best of our nation’s economic and political traditions, and improve on them, by pursuing policies that reduce inequality—and by doing so, boost broadly shared economic growth. Heather Boushey (@HBoushey) is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and former Chief Economist on Hillary Clinton’s transition team. She is the author of Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict and coeditor of After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality (both from Harvard). The New York Times has called Boushey one of the “most vibrant voices in the field” and Politico twice named her one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.” Dr Tahnee Ooms (@TahneeOoms) is a researcher at the International Inequalities Institute whose research focusses on how capital incomes feed back into rising overall income and wealth inequality, with a specific focus on the measurement of economic inequality using quantitative methods, and how to shape and communicate findings in a way they can be of practical use for policy and the real world. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.