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#Science

  • ESA Explores Beyond series – Spotlight on spacewalking E05
    European Space Agency
    25:40
    Science
    199

    October 2019 is a busy month for spacewalking, and November will be no different. In this episode Ally and Stephen look at what it takes to prepare for and perform a spacewalk or EVA with head of ESA's EVA and Parabolic Flight Training Unit Hervé Stevenin with special content from ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano.

  • As Seas Rise And Rivers Flood, Communities Look For A Way Out
    SciFri
    34:01
    Science
    1,174

    Retreating from flooding caused by climate change may seem unappealing. But communities are increasingly embracing the idea.

  • StarTalk Live at NYCC 2019 with Neil deGrasse Tyson
    StarTalk Radio
    01:02:56
    Science
    0

    StarTalk returns to the main stage in front of a packed house at NY Comic Con. Neil deGrasse Tyson, co-host Chuck Nice, and StarTalk geek-in-chief astrophysicist Charles Liu, PhD explore the science found in comics, sci fi, and popular fiction! (Warning: Adult Language) NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons and All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/startalk-live-at-nycc-2019-with-neil-degrasse-tyson/ Thanks to this week’s Patrons for supporting us: Heidi Ritzel, Sydney Reising, Andy Green, Michael Brown, Victoria Delpiano, and Cesar Alban. Photo Credit: Knightmare6.

  • WSS S4E5: Meteorites Tell the Story of the Solar System
    Science at Western
    24:58
    Science
    90

    Dr. Desmond Moser joins the podcast to explain how his latest paper, detailing the analysis of meteorites, can explain the history of Earth, and all our neighbours in the solar system.

  • Digging Into Ancient Clam Aquaculture
    SciFri
    08:54
    Science
    1,068

    What the clam gardens of indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest can teach us about sustainable aquaculture

  • 538 - Nobels and Astrophysics
    Science For The People
    01:01:11
    Science
    0

    This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.

  • How ‘Proactive Policing’ Might Impact Health
    SciFri
    23:18
    Science
    1,033

    There is some evidence to suggest that proactive policing tactics, which include “stop-and-frisk” and “hot spots” policing, are effective in reducing crime, but at what cost?

  • Lessons of Apollo
    NASA
    58:10
    Science
    1,198

    On Episode 113, science journalist and Apollo historian Andrew Chaikin discusses why the Moon is a desirable object for exploration and makes the case for ​applying the lessons of the Apollo lunar program to NASA's Artemis Program.

  • Season 2, Episode 1 - The Sky Is Falling
    NASA
    27:26
    Science
    3,301

    On February 15, 2003, the sky exploded in Russia. In this second season of the On a Mission podcast, instead of focusing on a single mission, we’re going to look at space rocks, also known as asteroids, from the view of many missions.

  • We Choose To Go To The Moon… But When?
    SciFri
    13:33
    Science
    1,146

    The Trump administration’s goal of getting American boots back on the moon by 2024 may have hit a snag.

  • 386 - Trachée n'est pas jouer
    Podcast Science
    01:16:46
    Science
    7,235

    Soutenez nous sur https://Patreon.com/PodcastScience //
    Retrouvez nous sur https://PodcastScience.fm //
    Twitter: https://Twitter.com/PodcastScience //
    Facebook: https://Facebook.com/PodcastScience //

    De l’importance de l’oxygène dans le monde vivant... Cette semaine le jury du prix Nobel a décerné celui de médecine à trois chercheurs qui ont consacré leur travaux à l’adaptation des cellules à la quantité d'oxygène qui leur est disponible. Et en miroir, heureux hasard, notre Taupo, a aussi décidé de vous en parler. Mais en partant d’une problématique fort différente. Car ce soir nous allons voir ensemble les structures que l’on peut rencontrer chez les insectes pour subvenir à leurs besoins en 0xygène . Respirez, nous sommes le mercredi 9 octobre de l’an 2019, vous êtes sur Podcast Science, émission 386, bienvenue!

  • Quake Sol 173
    NASA
    00:46
    Science
    586,208

    A recording of a magnitude 3.7 marsquake from InSight's seismometer, called SEIS. This quake was recorded on May 22, 2019 (the 173rd Martian day, or sol, of the mission). Far below the human range of hearing, this sonification from SEIS had to be sped up and slightly processed to be audible through headphones.

  • PANDEMIC!!!
    Science Vs
    37:05
    Science
    0

    If a pandemic ripped across the world, how bad would it really get? You’ve heard the horror stories, but you’ve never heard one like this. Dr. Anthony Fauci, who advises the President on emerging infectious diseases, helps us out. Credits: This episode was produced by our senior producer Kaitlyn Sawrey, with help from Wendy Zukerman, Michelle Dang, Lexi Krupp, Rose Rimler and Meryl Horn. We’re edited by Caitlin Kenney and Blythe Terrell. Extra writing help from Kevin Christopher Snipes. Fact checking by Diane Kelly. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Bobby Lord and Marcus Thorne Bagala. Special thanks to Frank Lopez. Dr. Eric Toner, Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, Beth Maldin Morgenthau, Dr. Melvin Sanicas, Professor Michael Osterholm, Dr. Patrick Saunders Hastings, Rosemary Gibson, Thomas Bollyky, Dr. Ashleigh Tuite, Professor Stephen Morse, Dr. Lalitha Sundaram, Professor David N. Fisman, Lynette Brammer, Dr. Mohamed Naguib, Dr. Yeulong Shu, Dr. Dan Jernigan, Dr Kirsty Short, and special thanks to Bess Davenport at CDC. Death toll modeling came from the Institute for Disease Modeling, with valuable guidance from Dr. Mandy Izzo and Dr. Kurt Frey. Thanks to our actors, Annabelle Fox as Mindy, as well as William Dufris, Alice Kors, Dani Cervone, Robin Miles, Jordan Cobb, Jonathan Woodward, Ian Lowe and Casey Wortmann. Directed by William Dufris with help from me, Wendy Zukerman, Kaitlyn Sawrey and Fred Grenhalgh. Recording by Fred Greenhalgh and Peter Leonard. Also thank you to all the Gimlet people who performed various drafts including Chad Chenail, Gabe Lozada, Jasmine Romero and MR Daniel. And a huge thank you to everyone who listened and gave comments - especially the Zukerman Family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson. Finally, a huge thank you to Jorge Just, Stevie Lane, Phoebe Flanigan, Chris Giliberti, Justin McGolrick and Katie Pastore.

  • Quake Sol 235
    NASA
    00:15
    Science
    348,596

    A recording of a magnitude 3.3 marsquake from InSight's seismometer, called SEIS. This quake was recorded on July 25, 2019 (Sol 235). Far below the human range of hearing, this sonification from SEIS had to be sped up and slightly processed to be audible through headphones.

  • Humans Might Be Able To Regrow Cartilage
    SciFri
    08:30
    Science
    1,326

    Researchers found that the cartilage in our ankles might be able to turnover more easily compared to our hips and knees.

  • InSight Dinks And Donks Sample
    NASA
    02:00
    Science
    109,610

    A recording of "dinks and donks," strange sounds created by friction inside of InSight's seismometer, called SEIS. Scientists aren't entirely sure what causes each of these sounds, by they are created by parts inside the seismometer contracting as they cool down, especially during sunset. These were recorded on just after sundown on July 16, 2019 (Sol 226).

  • 537 - Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
    Science For The People
    53:32
    Science
    0

    Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in.

  • How To Build More Trust In Science
    SciFri
    24:50
    Science
    1,443

    In her new book, Naomi Oreskes says we should trust science, but not for the reasons you might think.

  • Why the world needs to put forests on the global agenda
    CIFOR
    05:41
    Scientific
    275

    Climate change has reached a tipping point, becoming a climate crisis that is having a domino effect on many of our world’s forests. It is now crucial for global leaders to come together and hold an Earth Forest Summit. Robert Nasi, Director General of CIFOR, and Marc Palahí, Director of EFI, discuss the crucial role forests play in a sustainable future and why they need to be part of the global agenda.

  • The Decision-Making Puzzle
    SciFri
    12:06
    Science
    1,269

    What observing champion Tetris players can teach researchers about how the brain makes snap decisions.