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#Science

  • What’s At The Center Of The Milky Way? (Hint: Not Nougat.)
    SciFri
    11:57
    Science
    1,057

    The discovery of a strange gas raises questions about the activity in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

  • One Way To Keep COVID-19 Out Of Classrooms? Better Air.
    SciFri
    17:17
    Science
    1,011

    A mechanical engineering professor explains how to lower your risk of infection inside.

  • Welcome Home, Bob And Doug!
    NASA
    01:12:41
    Science
    637

    For Episode 159, Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley recount their return to Earth at their welcome home ceremony and crew news conference in Houston. The NASA astronauts made history in August as the first to splash down in an American spacecraft in 45 years, thus completing NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission.

  • Mini Mask Update
    Science Vs
    04:42
    0

    MASKS. Since the early days of the pandemic, it’s been tough to nail down how much they can really do to slow down the spread of the virus. We speak to industrial hygienist Dr. Rachael Jones and share some new science that puts the final nail in the coffin of this debate (*hint* yes, you should wear a mask — your friends, family and neighbors too). Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/3lH5grh This episode was produced by Michelle Dang, with help from Wendy Zukerman, Rose Rimler, Hannah Harris Green and Nick DelRose. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Marcus Bagala, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. And special thanks to the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.

  • A Key to Immunotherapy May Be Bacterial
    SciFri
    16:59
    Science
    1,002

    Researchers have discovered that a species of bacteria can help turn on immune T cells in mice.

  • The Body Remembers: COVID-19, The Immune System, And You
    SciFri
    17:28
    Science
    994

    There’s still plenty we don’t know about the novel pathogen, but your immune system seems to learn how to fight off COVID-19.

  • Ask A Cephalopod Scientist: Getting Our Arms Around Your Questions
    SciFri
    16:57
    Science
    1,029

    How do you measure cephalopod intelligence? What is the largest cuttlefish? And other questions for a cephalopod scientist.

  • How Did Hurricane Laura Get So Bad, So Fast?
    SciFri
    11:44
    Science
    926

    How Hurricane Laura got so powerful, so quickly. Plus the strange CDC decision to narrow recommendations for COVID-19 testing.

  • Exploring Grit, with Angela Duckworth
    StarTalk Radio
    57:47
    Science
    0

    What is grit? Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and psychologist, author, and world-renown expert on grit Angela Duckworth, PhD, answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries on the science of grit. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/exploring-grit-with-angela-duckworth/ Thanks to our Patrons Dakota McCreary, Maxwell Freitag, Darrin Renke, Sheri-Lynn Kurisu, Sveinbjorn Byrd, Steve Calfee, Nisarg Joshi, and Ricky Saullfor supporting us this week. Image Credit: NASA.

  • A pilot study exploring interventions for physician distress in pediatric subspecialists
    Nature Research
    13:33
    Science
    509

    Institutions and healthcare systems had started to introduce wellness initiatives following the growing realization of the widespread problem of physician distress and burnout. Whilst these programs might be effective, there is currently a lack of evidence about who uses them and whether they are best suited to their target audience. In this episode, we meet Dr. Andrea Weintraub from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who conducted a cross-sectional national survey amongst different pediatric subspecialties to find out which initiatives were available, whether people knew about them or used them, and to better understand what initiatives pediatricians would like to see made available. Related Article: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41390-020-0805-x

  • Shock And Awe
    Flash Forward
    53:13
    Science
    37

    Today we travel to a future where super-bandages can heal wounds really fast. Sound like science fiction? Well it might be closer than you think! More info & show notes here: https://www.flashforwardpod.com/2020/09/01/zip-zap/

  • Probiotics: Scam or Superfood?
    Science Vs
    32:51
    0

    Kombucha, kefir and other probiotic-crammed foods are marketed as charmers of the human microbiome — and the key to immune, gut and brain health. But how much does the microbiome actually matter, and do probiotics live up to the hype? To learn more we talked with biomedical engineering professor Ilana Brito, immunologist Dr. Yasmine Belkaid, psychiatry professor Ted Dinan, and microbiologist Dr. Namrata Iyer. UPDATE 8/28/20: An earlier version of this episode said there was a little bit of evidence that specific microbes can help with irritable bowel disease. This should have been inflammatory bowel disease. Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/34ElmvR This episode was produced by Wendy Zukerman, with help from Nicholas DelRose, Rose Rimler, Meryl Horn, Michelle Dang, Sinduja Srinivasan, and Hannah Harris Green. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell. Fact checking by Diane Kelly. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Marcus Bagala, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. A huge thanks to all the researchers we got in touch with for this episode, including Professor Martin J Blaser, Dr Kirsten Berding Harold, Professor Andrew Holmes, Professor Eran Elinav, Professor Margaret J. Morris, Professor Tim Spector, Professor Dena Lyra, Professor Eric Alms, Dr Joel Babdor, Joana de Cruz Pereira, Josh Jones and all the others. And special thanks to Walter Rimler, the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.

  • Ambi ORTF
    Listening Earth
    02:11
    193

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.

  • Zanzibar - Rainforest of the Spice Island: Album Sample
    Listening Earth
    03:01
    Nature sounds
    256

    3 minute audio sample from the 137 minute nature soundscape recording; “Zanzibar - Rainforest of the Spice Island”. Listen to the complete recording: http://www.listeningearth.com/play/album/104Zanzibar.php The island of Zanzibar lies a short distance off the coast of Tanzania. Despite Jozani forest being the largest intact area of primary forest on the island, it is still relatively small, making it all the more precious as a refuge for many rare species. Iconic among them are the endangered red colobus monkeys, found only on Zanzibar. Entering Jozani forest after dawn, our first impressions are of distant birdsong, a gentle susurration of tree crickets and a sense of peace. The tangle of trees, vines and dense vegetation affords habitat for numerous species, and as we settle into listening more intently, these become evident. Green-backed camaropteras patrol the undergrowth and attract our attention by being very vocal. Eastern nicators sing back and forth to each other with rich melodies, while greenbulls burble warmly. Two species of tinkerbird create a soft background of steady piping notes, crowned hornbills appear with piercing calls, and forest weavers, attending to their ball-shaped nests suspended in the canopy, give the most unusual combination of crystalline whistles and buzzy tones. Then the colobus monkeys arrive, doing their rounds of the forest and crashing through the foliage overhead, occasionally giving voice with exhilarating calls and wheezy social interactions. As they move on, we note several different species of sunbird as they too move around the forest, while the rich tones of tropical boubous echo through the forest. Concluding with a final visit from another colobus troop, this spacious recording will take you to an exotic and biodiverse island rainforest off the coast of equatorial Africa.

  • Gravity Assist: Our Sun, Our Life, with Vladimir Airapetian
    NASA
    15:53
    Science
    2,235

    How well do you know the Sun? It hasn’t always looked the way it does today. Billions of years ago, the Sun was fainter but also more active, throwing out huge flares of radiation in powerful tantrums. This “young Sun” helped shape the evolution of life as we know it. By understanding what our Sun was like when life emerged on Earth, scientists can look to other stars in the galaxy and think about whether life could emerge on planets there, too. Vladimir Airapetian, scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, explains what researchers hope to find as they gaze beyond our solar system.

  • Ambi Omni
    Listening Earth
    02:11
    151

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.

  • Ambi XY
    Listening Earth
    02:12
    114

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.

  • SASS
    Listening Earth
    02:16
    127

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.

  • Ambi XY 180
    Listening Earth
    02:11
    111

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.

  • Iso-Binaural
    Listening Earth
    02:16
    121

    Comparison of nature soundscape microphone arrays by Andrew Skeoch and Doug Quin. 4 microphone rigs were set up side by side, all axis aligned: MS (DQ), SASS (AS), Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic (DQ) and Iso-binaural (AS). All recording onto Sound Devices 7 series recorders at 24bit, DQ at 48kHz, AS at 44.1kHz. DQ's raw levels were quite low. The MS rig was close to the ground (see pic) MS: Sennheiser MKH 30 + MKH 40 in Røde blimp SASS: pair Sennheiser MKH 20s in Crown SASS head Ambisonic: Soundfield SP200 Ambisonic, upright in Røde blimp Iso-Binaural: Pair Sennheiser MKH 8020s, ~20cm apart, oriented 180º with convex baffles Location: Wet sclerophyll forest in small gully, Lower Gellibrand River, Otway Ranges, Vic. 18th February, approx 7am (post dawn chorus) The ambisonic microphone can be rendered into almost any configuration, using Harpex proprietary software. DQ created several different renders as examples of what it can do. Screen shots of the software settings for reference. The MS rig has been decoded to stereo wide. In preparing edits, DQ's files were down-sampled to 44.1 and everything to 16bit. Levels are subjective; all files have been normalised referencing the noise floor. This means some of the ‘noisier’ mics have been attenuated slightly to balance, thus reducing peak birdsong levels.